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Exotic Caribbean In-Depth

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1501

Why Book With Us?

  • Worry free planning
  • Exceptional knowledge
  • Family owned & operated
  • Superior value

Have a Question?

Don’t hesitate to give us a call. Our team of experts are happy to assist you in creating your next dream vacation.

1.800.800.7252

travel@lloydstravel.com

14 Days
Availability : Departures January - March, 2022
Bridgetown, Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Tour Details
Seabourn Exotic Caribbean In-Depth

An unforgettable fortnight among the glittering resorts, isolated yacht harbors and quaint island villages of Seabourn’s Uncommon Caribbean.

4 Departure dates to choose from:

08-22 January, 2022

29 January-12 February, 2022

19 February-05 March, 2022

12-26 March, 2022

Prices starting from Ocean View $8280 CAD per person including port taxes.

Prices starting from Veranda $8655 CAD per person including port taxes.

Prices include gratuities and all alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages.

Airfare additional

Departure Location

Bridgetown, Barbados

End Location

Bridgetown, Barbados

Price Includes

  • 14-Day Cruise
  • Intuitive, personalized service
  • All ocean-front suites, luxuriously appointed
  • Complimentary premium spirits & fine wines available on board at all times
  • Welcome champagne & complimentary in-suite bar stocked with your preferences
  • World-class complimentary dining

Price Excludes

  • Travel insurance
  • Any private expenses
  • Optional excursions
  • Visa's, if required
  • International flights & transfers

Tour Specialist

  • Deborah Charles
What to Expect

With white-sand beaches, natural caverns and floral forests, Barbados draws visitors to its slice of the eastern Caribbean. City tours of bustling capital Bridgetown are popular, as are island tours that show off the estates and plantation homes of the countryside. Foodies can feast on Bajan favorites or take a cooking class to recreate the cuisine at home. During a beach day, visitors lounge with rum-based drinks to the tune of calypso or head to the water to swim with turtles or snorkel above a shipwreck. Other excursion options include a rum party cruise, horseback rides on the beach or a fishing excursion for blue marlin, barracuda and more.

 

Highlights
  • Visit the shining white beaches of Antigua
  • Get the real, unspoilt Caribbean experience in Terre-De-Haut, Iles Des Saintes, Guadelou
  • Take in the quiet beaches, lush rain forest and imposing Mont Pelee in Fort-De-France, Martinique
  • Indulge in watersports in the Tobago Cays
For more information on this tour, or help with booking, please contact your favourite Lloyds Travel Agent!
Itinerary

Day 1Bridgetown, Barbados

Bridgetown, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is an elegant capital city proudly displaying its 400 years of British heritage. Although, originally settled by Amerindian peoples 1,500 years ago, in the 17th century Barbados became one of the largest and most successful sugarcane producing areas in the world. At one point in time the income from sugar outweighed that of all the other British colonies combined. A stroll through town will guide you through Bridgetown’s history, to the statue of Admiral Horatio Nelson, past the Parliament Buildings, St Michaels Cathedral, St Mary’s church, Jubilee Gardens and eventually over Chamberlain Bridge. A picturesque seaside boardwalk will lead you to one of the many exceptional shoreline cafes and restaurants. One thousand year old Baobab trees in Queen’s Park, the largest in the Caribbean, stand as silent witnesses to past life here. Lounge on a serene beach, explore a plantation, discover sea turtles and even sample one of the islands renowned rhum distilleries.

Day 2Port Elizabeth, Bequia, St. Vincent And The Grenadines

Bequia’s Admiralty Bay is a favorite yachtsman’s anchorage. They ferry ashore to join the friendly, low-key locals “under the almond tree,” the chosen meeting place. Stroll along the Belmont Walkway to the Gingerbread for homemade nutmeg ice cream, or Frangipani, run by the daughter of a former prime minister. Continue to lovely, golden Princess Margaret Beach, or round the bend to Lower Bay. Don’t miss the excellent craftsmanship at the Sargeant Brothers Model Boat Shop, it’s a Bequia specialty.

Day 3Castries, St. Lucia

St. Lucia is the sort of island that travelers to the Caribbean dream about–a small, lush tropical gem that is still relatively unknown. The Atlantic Ocean kisses its eastern shore, while the beaches of the west coast owe their beauty to the calm Caribbean Sea. St. Lucia seems like an island plucked from the South Pacific and set down in the Caribbean. Its dramatic twin coastal peaks, the Pitons, soar 2,500 feet up from the sea, sheltering magnificent rain forests where wild orchids, giant ferns, and birds of paradise flourish. Brilliantly-plumed tropical birds abound, including endangered species like the indigenous St. Lucia parrot.

Day 4Terre-De-Haut, Iles Des Saintes, Guadeloupe

The Iles des Saintes, a tiny cluster of islets off the southern coast of Guadeloupe is what the doctor ordered, if he ordered an unspoiled Caribbean experience. No franchise duty free, no big hotels, no casinos. It is what much of the Caribbean used to be like. Stroll around the little town of Bourg de Saintes. Shop for real French cosmetics from the sidewalk vendors. Grab a seat and a beer and revel in the weather and the pace of the past.

Day 5Charlestown, Nevis, St Kitts And Nevis

Pretty, unassuming Nevis might be the definition of laid-back. Charlestown gets excited by the arrival of the daily ferry from St. Kitts. Stroll by the Museum of Nevis History, built on the foundations of the birthplace of U.S. founding father Alexander Hamilton. The 17th and 18th centuries, in fact, were a heyday here. A group of Sephardic Jews arrived from Brazil, from where they had been evicted. They brought with them the secret to crystalizing sugar, which transformed the economy of the Caribbean. Their humble cemetery’s headstones are inscribed in Hebrew and Portuguese, dating from between 1672 to 1768, during which time they made up 25 percent of the island’s populace. Another nice walk is the Nevis Botanical Gardens.

Day 6St. Johns, Antigua And Barbuda

Antigua is blessed with an abundance of shining white beaches, and many of these have sprouted top-end resort hotels that engender golf courses and other amenities counted among the best in the Caribbean. A pleasant drive up through farms and tiny villages leads to the commanding fortress on Shirley Heights, from which you can survey the town and the harbor of Nelson’s Dockyard across the island. Once a carenage for British frigates, today it is an enclave of shops and restaurants.

Day 7Carambola Beach, Saint Kitts And Nevis

A classic golden arc of sugary sand at South Friar’s Bay, Carambola is home to the island’s most luxurious beach clubs and restaurants. Umbrellas, loungers and optional water sports abound for those so inclined. Otherwise St. Kitts has other attractions, including a number of lovingly preserved plantation great houses, the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Brimstone Hill Fortress and a scenic narrow gauge sugarcane railway.

Day 8Philipsburg, Sint Maarten

Since 2010, Sint Maarten has been a constituent country within the kingdom of The Netherlands. It comprises the “Dutch Side” of the island of Saint-Martin, the other half being a French overseas territory. Philipsburg is its capital and a busy deep-water port city. It is a popular port for cruise ships, and consequently boasts a thriving duty-free shopping community, a range of resorts and villas, and numerous leisure and sightseeing activities, as well as a well-served airport.

Day 9Sopers Hole (Frenchmans Cay), BVI

This snug harbor at the West End of Tortola is the classic Caribbean yacht haven, tucked between the high ground of West End on one side and Frenchman’s Cay on the other. It was a notorious den for pirates in the past, who used the high ground to watch for naval ships or potential victims. The marinas and resorts were hard hit by hurricanes Irma and Maria in August and September 2017. But most services have been restored and the community is eager to welcome visitors again. Check on the progress at Pusser’s Landing, the multi-service home of the famous wood-distilled rum and the Painkiller cocktail, which is good even if you’re not in pain. There are numerous restaurants, cafes and bars providing hospitable rest stops for people-watching and yarn-spinning.

Day 10Gustavia, Saint Barthelemy

Tiny St. Barts, as it is commonly called, lies 125 miles northwest of the French island of Guadeloupe, of which it is a dependency. Its geographic features include steep, green, once-active volcano hills, deep valleys, and beautiful beaches. Founded by the French, ceded to Sweden then returned to France, the toy-scaled capital of Gustavia is built around the harbor on the island’s southwest coast. Many of the island’s inhabitants are descendants of settlers from Brittany, Normandy and Sweden. Today they operate small inns, cafes, restaurants and boutiques that are housed in old buildings of Swedish colonial and French Creole architecture. Too small for most cruise ships, Gustavia’s harbor is a favorite layover for sailing yachts, and with prices well beyond the means of the masses, visits are mostly limited to a few hours of day-trippers from nearby St. Martin/St. Maarten. The majority of visitors staying on the island still come from among the privileged who treasure the laid-back atmosphere and small-gem perfection of St. Barts.

Day 11Basseterre, St Kitts And Nevis

“The Beautiful Sisters,” St. Kitts and Nevis are separated by a two-mile-wide strait but joined together as an independent island nation. Known and loved for their sleepy pace, these islands are awakening to become an “in” place among well traveled North Americans and Europeans. A small, green volcanic speck in the blue Caribbean, St. Kitts offers quiet beaches, remnants of the old British plantocracy, and dreamy days under silk-cotton trees, soothed by the scents of flamboyants and frangipani. The native Arawak and Carib Indians called St. Kitts the fertile isle, and until as recently as 2005, the island was still dependent upon sugar for a large segment of its economy.

Day 12Cabrits, Dominica

Cabrits is a promontory on the northern end of Dominica, consisting of two hills that are remnants of an extinct volcano. It was originally separate from the island but is now connected by a causeway between Prince Rupert Bay and Douglas Bay. The peninsula comprises Cabrits National Park, a 1,313-acre enclave encompassing coral reefs, tropical forest, wetlands and the historic site of Fort Shirley. A ship berth and terminal have been constructed in conjunction with the park. The peninsula gets its name from the Spanish word cabras, or goats, which were stocked on the island by early visiting sailors, to provide a source of meat during subsequent calls. The national park is also the northern terminus of the Waitukubuli Trail, the Caribbean’s first long-distance hiking trail, which stretches 115 miles (185 km) from Scott’s Head on the island’s southern shore to the park. The trail’s 14th and final segment is a 6.7-mile (10.8 km) moderate trek from the village of Capuchin. Fort Shirley was one of the most impressive Georgian military outposts in the region, started in 1765 by the British and expanded during the French occupation between 1778 and 1784. The outpost eventually numbered over 50 buildings and housed as many as 600 men. The fort was the site of a mutiny by the West Indian Regiment in 1806 that freed nearly 10,000 slave soldiers, the first act of mass emancipation in the British Empire. The fort was abandoned in 1854. Restoration began in 1982 and several buildings including the Officer’s Quarters are restored. Others remain scenic ruins scattered through the surrounding forest.

Day 13Fort-De-France, Martinique

Fort-de-France, Martinique’s capital, with its narrow streets and iron grill-worked balconies, brings to mind New Orleans or Nice. This distinctly French island is a full-fledged department of France, with members in parliament and the senate. Naturally, everyone speaks French, as well as a rapid-fire Creole. The island features a varied landscape, from quiet beaches to lush rain forest to imposing Mont Pelee. Not surprisingly, the shopping in Fort-de-France has a decidedly Gallic flair. Bienvenue to this bit of France in the Caribbean.

Day 14Saline Bay, Mayreau, St. Vincent And The Grenadines

At this idyllic islet in the Tobago Cays, we sometimes anchor and indulge in a water sports Marina Day – not available on Seabourn Quest.

Day 15Bridgetown, Barbados

End of cruise

Photos


Why Book With Us?

  • Worry free planning
  • Exceptional knowledge
  • Family owned & operated
  • Superior value


Have a Question?

Don’t hesitate to give us a call. Our team of experts are happy to assist you in creating your next dream vacation.

1.800.800.7252

travel@lloydstravel.com