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Seabourn Caribbean Holidays

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Why Book With Us?

  • Worry free planning
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  • Family owned & operated
  • Superior value

Have a Question?

Don’t hesitate to give us a call. Our team of experts are happy to assist you in creating your next dream vacation.

1.800.800.7252

travel@lloydstravel.com

21 Days
Availability : December 17, 2022
Bridgetown, Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Tour Details
Seabourn 21-Day Caribbean Holidays

Swim with playful dolphins, snorkel over spectacular coral gardens, and wander colorful colonial towns designated as UNESCO World Heritage sites. Go canyoning down rushing waterfalls, set your heart aflutter at a butterfly farm, and watch flamingoes strut their stuff around brilliant pink salt pans. 

Departs December 17, 2022

Cost per person starting from $14,498 CAD Verandah Stateroom based on double occupancy and includes port tax

Price include gratuities, unlimited internet and all alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages.

Airfare additional

Departure Location

Bridgetown, Barbados

End Location

Bridgetown, Barbados

Price Includes

  • 21-Day Cruise
  • Intuitive, personalized service
  • All ocean-front suites, luxuriously appointed
  • Complimentary premium spirits & fine wines available on board at all times
  • Welcome champagne & complimentary in-suite bar stocked with your preferences
  • World-class complimentary dining

Price Excludes

  • Travel insurance
  • Any private expenses
  • Optional excursions
  • Visa's, if required
  • International flights & transfers

Tour Specialist

  • Deborah Charles
What to Expect
Your Ship: Seabourn Ovation

Introducing Seabourn Ovation, the sister-ship to the already prestigious Seabourn EncoreSeabourn Ovation represents another welcome stage in the evolution of small ship cruising, which Seabourn pioneered and has consistently expanded and enriched for all of our small ship cruises.

 

 
Highlights
  • Visit the shining white beaches of Antigua
  • Stroll through the historic zone of Old San Juan, Puerto Rico
  • Take in the quiet beaches, lush rain forest and imposing Mont Pelee in Fort-De-France, Martinique
  • Relax on a classic golden arc of sugary sand at South Friar’s Bay, Carambola
For more information on this tour, or help with booking, please contact your favourite Lloyds Travel Agent!
Itinerary

Day 1Bridgetown, Barbados

Bridgetown, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is an elegant capital city proudly displaying its 400 years of British heritage. Although, originally settled by Amerindian peoples 1,500 years ago, in the 17th century Barbados became one of the largest and most successful sugarcane producing areas in the world. At one point in time the income from sugar outweighed that of all the other British colonies combined. A stroll through town will guide you through Bridgetown’s history, to the statue of Admiral Horatio Nelson, past the Parliament Buildings, St Michaels Cathedral, St Mary’s church, Jubilee Gardens and eventually over Chamberlain Bridge. A picturesque seaside boardwalk will lead you to one of the many exceptional shoreline cafes and restaurants. One thousand year old Baobab trees in Queen’s Park, the largest in the Caribbean, stand as silent witnesses to past life here. Lounge on a serene beach, explore a plantation, discover sea turtles and even sample one of the islands renowned rhum distilleries.

Day 2Castries, Saint Lucia

St. Lucia is the sort of island that travelers to the Caribbean dream about–a small, lush tropical gem that is still relatively unknown. The Atlantic Ocean kisses its eastern shore, while the beaches of the west coast owe their beauty to the calm Caribbean Sea. St. Lucia seems like an island plucked from the South Pacific and set down in the Caribbean. Its dramatic twin coastal peaks, the Pitons, soar 2,500 feet up from the sea, sheltering magnificent rain forests where wild orchids, giant ferns, and birds of paradise flourish. Brilliantly-plumed tropical birds abound, including endangered species like the indigenous St. Lucia parrot.

Day 3Basse-Terre, Guadeloupe

Located on the smaller of Guadeloupe’s two “butterfly wing” lobes, Basse-Terre is the capital of the French overseas department, although smaller than Point-a-Pitre on Grand Terre. It was the island’s first town, founded in 1643, and Fort Saint Charles, now called Fort Delgres, was built in 1650 to protect against English attacks. Visit the Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadeloupe, with its separate Bell Tower, and the Town Hall dating from 1889, which holds seven paintings added in the 1930s and now all registered historical landmarks. The island offers many picturesque fishing villages now welcoming tourists, including Deshaise near Grand Anse beach and Saint Claude in the forested hills. The towering volcano of La Soufriere is part of the National Park, as is the Reserve Cousteau at Pigeon Island, where divers and snorkelers flock to reefs that enchanted the late undersea explorer. The towering Chutes de Carbet waterfalls are another popular natural attraction.

Day 4Carambola Beach, Saint Kitts And Nevis

A classic golden arc of sugary sand at South Friar’s Bay, Carambola is home to the island’s most luxurious beach clubs and restaurants. Umbrellas, loungers and optional water sports abound for those so inclined. Otherwise St. Kitts has other attractions, including a number of lovingly preserved plantation great houses, the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Brimstone Hill Fortress and a scenic narrow gauge sugarcane railway.

Day 5At Sea

Day 6Willemstad, Curacao

Delightful Willemstad is the capital of the five-island Netherlands Antilles, which in turn are part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. Gabled buildings bring to mind Dutch cities, while working windmills dot the countryside, helping to provide the island with much-needed fresh water. Two bridges connect Otrobanda and Punda, the city’s two halves. The Queen Emma Pontoon Bridge, now exclusively a foot bridge, was built in 1888. The imposing Queen Juliana Bridge arches over the channel, providing the link for motor vehicles. Shoppers will find no shortage of temptations here, while those so inclined will find excellent scuba diving opportunities.

Day 7Oranjestad, Aruba

Although no written record of the island’s discovery by Europeans exists, it was in 1499 that Alonso de Ojeda landed in Aruba and claimed the island for Spain. Over the years, possession changed from the Spanish to the Dutch to the British and back to the Dutch, with independence promised by 1996. Aruba is one of only a few Caribbean islands where the indigenous Indian population was not decimated by invading Europeans. The native Aruban today is a mixture of Arawak Indian, and Spanish and Dutch colonizers. The official language is Dutch, with both English and Spanish widely spoken. The local population’s everyday tongue is Papiamento, a mixture of all of the above plus a few words left over from the days of the Arawak. The countryside is dotted with cottages surrounded by cactus fences and bright splashes of bougainvillea, oleander and hibiscus. During our call, enjoy a stroll through the capital, Oranjestad. Colorful Wilhelminastraat is lined with typical Aruban buildings of the Dutch Colonial style, and plenty of shops offering duty-free goods.

Day 8Kralendijk, Bonaire

Discovered in 1499 by an expedition led by Amerigo Vespucci, Bonaire has quite a varied history. Indian drawings, which can be seen today in several places, depict life and events which took place centuries before the island’s discovery by Europeans. The Spanish colonization lasted for little more than a century, ending in 1634, when the Dutch from Curaccao arrived to occupy Bonaire during their war against Spain. In 1636, Bonaire became a Dutch colony. Salt production, corn and stock breeding were developed as major economic elements. Today, the island’s economy depends largely on tourism. A friendly ‘bon bini’ from the locals greets you during your visit ashore. Enjoy a stroll through Kralendijk, past the fish market, duty-free shops of Breedestraat, the waterfront promenade and the quaint toy-like houses exemplifying the Dutch colonial architecture.

Day 9At Sea

Day 10Port Elizabeth, Bequia, St. Vincent And The Grenadines

Bequia’s Admiralty Bay is a favorite yachtsman’s anchorage. They ferry ashore to join the friendly, low-key locals “under the almond tree,” the chosen meeting place. Stroll along the Belmont Walkway to the Gingerbread for homemade nutmeg ice cream, or Frangipani, run by the daughter of a former prime minister. Continue to lovely, golden Princess Margaret Beach, or round the bend to Lower Bay. Don’t miss the excellent craftsmanship at the Sargeant Brothers Model Boat Shop, it’s a Bequia specialty.

Day 11Bridgetown, Barbados

Bridgetown, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is an elegant capital city proudly displaying its 400 years of British heritage. Although, originally settled by Amerindian peoples 1,500 years ago, in the 17th century Barbados became one of the largest and most successful sugarcane producing areas in the world. At one point in time the income from sugar outweighed that of all the other British colonies combined. A stroll through town will guide you through Bridgetown’s history, to the statue of Admiral Horatio Nelson, past the Parliament Buildings, St Michaels Cathedral, St Mary’s church, Jubilee Gardens and eventually over Chamberlain Bridge. A picturesque seaside boardwalk will lead you to one of the many exceptional shoreline cafes and restaurants. One thousand year old Baobab trees in Queen’s Park, the largest in the Caribbean, stand as silent witnesses to past life here. Lounge on a serene beach, explore a plantation, discover sea turtles and even sample one of the islands renowned rhum distilleries.

Day 12Trois Ilets, Martinique

Martinique is one of the most colorful and interesting islands in the Caribbean. Trois Ilets lies just across the Bay of Fort-de-France from the capital, on the peninsular arrondissement of Le Marin. Perhaps the most famous attraction in this area is the colonial plantation called La Pagerie, the birthplace and childhood home of Josephine Beauharnais, the Martinique-born woman who became the second wife and Empress to Napoleon Bonaparte. The stately plantation house and its manicured grounds are now a museum, furnished with period pieces and illustrating the privileged lifestyle of the master class during the French colonial slave period. Nearby, a gentleman named Gilbert La Rose has painstakingly recreated the complementary lifestyle of the slaves who supported this luxury, with a garden and museum called La Savane des Esclaves that includes thatched dwellings, artifacts and plantings of the era. Taken together, they serve to educate visitors about the early days of the island’s European occupation. Fort-de-France is a bustling seaport and market town, with handsome reminders of its colonial past including the ornate Schoelcher Library imported stone-by-stone from France. Further afield, the previous capital of St. Pierre was unexpectedly inundated with lava and ash from a disastrous eruption of looming Mt. Pelée in 1902, leaving a sort of latter-day Pompeii for visitors to see. The graceful cathedral and lush botanical gardens of Balata provide some relief, in the form of luxuriant tropical flowers, butterflies and hummingbirds.

Day 13Charlestown, Nevis, St Kitts And Nevis

Pretty, unassuming Nevis might be the definition of laid-back. Charlestown gets excited by the arrival of the daily ferry from St. Kitts. Stroll by the Museum of Nevis History, built on the foundations of the birthplace of U.S. founding father Alexander Hamilton. The 17th and 18th centuries, in fact, were a heyday here. A group of Sephardic Jews arrived from Brazil, from where they had been evicted. They brought with them the secret to crystalizing sugar, which transformed the economy of the Caribbean. Their humble cemetery’s headstones are inscribed in Hebrew and Portuguese, dating from between 1672 to 1768, during which time they made up 25 percent of the island’s populace. Another nice walk is the Nevis Botanical Gardens.

Day 14San Juan, Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico has been voluntarily associated with the United States since it was ceded by Spain in 1898. In 1952, this island country became a self-governing commonwealth territory of the United States. The capital, San Juan, is a teeming city of over 1.5 million. Remnants of colonial architecture stand side by side with the most modern high rises in this city of contrasts. The 7-square-block area, which contains the historic zone of Old San Juan, was once completely encircled by city walls and is still guarded by the impressive forts of El Morro and San Cristobal, which loom over the harbor as reminders of the centuries of Spanish rule. El Yunque rainforest, on the northeastern side of the island, is just one of many distinctive geographical features found here. Mountain lakes, waterfalls, teak forests, and three magnificent phosphorescent bays offer the visitor a variety of diversions.

Day 15Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic

The Dominican Republic’s capital is the largest city by population in the Caribbean region. It is also the oldest continuously occupied European city in the Americas. It was founded in 1496 by Bartolomeo Columbus, and named La Nueva Isabel after his royal Spanish patron. The settlement became the gateway to the Americas for the Spanish conquest, and most of the expeditions that delineated the rest of the New World originated there, taking advantage of the deepwater delta of the Ozama River. Today the city’s Colonial Zone is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and contains a remarkable legacy of 16th Century buildings, including the first cathedral in America, Catedral de Santa Maria la Menor; the first monastery, Monasterio de San Francisco, the first castle, Alacazar Colón and the first fortress: Fortaleza Ozama. The Museo de Casas Reales is another treasury of significant buildings. The Dominican dictator Trujillo renamed the city after himself between 1936 and 1961, but it regained its previous name following his assassination. The city is a fascinating and colorful place, revealing a vibrant hybrid culture with recognizable influences from native Taino, African and European ancestry. Many visitors purchase souvenir jewelry created out of the fossil amber mined on the island of Hispaniola, which the Dominican Republic shares with the nation of Haiti.

Day 16At Sea

Day 17Cruz Bay, St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands

St. John is the smallest of the three major U.S. Virgin Islands. Some two-thirds of its area, and large stretches of its coastal waters, are now included in the Virgin Islands National Park. It was established in 1956 on the initiative of Laurence Rockefeller, who bought this former sugar island and donated the land to the American people. St. John is now a great attraction for nature lovers and diving enthusiasts, with its small population living mainly from tourism.

Day 18St. Johns, Antigua And Barbuda

Antigua is blessed with an abundance of shining white beaches, and many of these have sprouted top-end resort hotels that engender golf courses and other amenities counted among the best in the Caribbean. A pleasant drive up through farms and tiny villages leads to the commanding fortress on Shirley Heights, from which you can survey the town and the harbor of Nelson’s Dockyard across the island. Once a carenage for British frigates, today it is an enclave of shops and restaurants.

Day 19Carambola Beach, Saint Kitts And Nevis

A classic golden arc of sugary sand at South Friar’s Bay, Carambola is home to the island’s most luxurious beach clubs and restaurants. Umbrellas, loungers and optional water sports abound for those so inclined. Otherwise St. Kitts has other attractions, including a number of lovingly preserved plantation great houses, the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Brimstone Hill Fortress and a scenic narrow gauge sugarcane railway.

Day 20Cabrits, Dominica

Cabrits is a promontory on the northern end of Dominica, consisting of two hills that are remnants of an extinct volcano. It was originally separate from the island but is now connected by a causeway between Prince Rupert Bay and Douglas Bay. The peninsula comprises Cabrits National Park, a 1,313-acre enclave encompassing coral reefs, tropical forest, wetlands and the historic site of Fort Shirley. A ship berth and terminal have been constructed in conjunction with the park. The peninsula gets its name from the Spanish word cabras, or goats, which were stocked on the island by early visiting sailors, to provide a source of meat during subsequent calls. The national park is also the northern terminus of the Waitukubuli Trail, the Caribbean’s first long-distance hiking trail, which stretches 115 miles (185 km) from Scott’s Head on the island’s southern shore to the park. The trail’s 14th and final segment is a 6.7-mile (10.8 km) moderate trek from the village of Capuchin. Fort Shirley was one of the most impressive Georgian military outposts in the region, started in 1765 by the British and expanded during the French occupation between 1778 and 1784. The outpost eventually numbered over 50 buildings and housed as many as 600 men. The fort was the site of a mutiny by the West Indian Regiment in 1806 that freed nearly 10,000 slave soldiers, the first act of mass emancipation in the British Empire. The fort was abandoned in 1854. Restoration began in 1982 and several buildings including the Officer’s Quarters are restored. Others remain scenic ruins scattered through the surrounding forest.

Day 21Hillsborough, Carriacou, Grenada

Carriacou is one of three islands in the Caribbean nation of Grenada; its largest town, Hillsborough, lies on the island’s western side. Since most cruise ships call on Grenada’s main island, Seabourn guests get to experience the quiet, laidback island lifestyle of years ago. Days here are spent lazing on aptly named Paradise Beach or exploring spectacular coral gardens and shoals of tropical fish around White Island and tiny Sandy Island. Belair National Park encompasses a former sugar cane plantation, with remains of the 18th-century great house and a windmill used to cultivate the cane; it also offers stunning views across the north end of the island to Petite Martinique. The Carriacou Museum, housed in a renovated cotton gin mill, features exhibits on the island’s indigenous Amerindians and colonial-era artifacts. Follow the path from Petite Carenage Beach to one of the Caribbean’s most intact mangrove ecosystems, which attracts numerous migratory and shorebirds; or head to Tyrell Bay to view its unique oyster beds where “tree oysters” grow on the mangrove roots.

Day 22Bridgetown, Barbados

End of cruise

Photos


Why Book With Us?

  • Worry free planning
  • Exceptional knowledge
  • Family owned & operated
  • Superior value


Have a Question?

Don’t hesitate to give us a call. Our team of experts are happy to assist you in creating your next dream vacation.

1.800.800.7252

travel@lloydstravel.com