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Seabourn Iceland, North Cape & The Midnight Sun

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15 Days
Availability : June 23, 2020
Reykjavik
Reykjavik
Tour Details

15-Day Seabourn Iceland, North Cape & The Midnight Sun

June 23, 2020 |  15 days | Seabourn Quest

Follow the traditional Viking sea-routes from Iceland to Norwegian fjords of their homeland and back to spectacular Iceland.

Book now and get a Veranda Suite for the price of an Ocean View Suite, as well as $250 USD Ship Board Credits per person and free Wifi! 

Prices per person starting from $7,811 CAD per person

Departure Location

Reykjavik, Iceland

End Location

Reykjavik, Iceland

Price Includes

  • 15-day cruise
  • Intuitive, personalized service
  • All ocean-front suites, luxuriously appointed
  • Complimentary premium spirits and fine wines available on board at all times
  • Welcome Champagne and complimentary in-suite bar stocked with your preferences
  • World-class dining, enhanced through culinary partnership with Chef Thomas Keller
  • All dining venues are complimentary, dine where and when you wish

Price Excludes

  • Travel insurance
  • Any private expenses
  • Optional excursions
  • Visa's, if required

Tour Specialist

  • Bob Young
What to Expect

Your Ship: Seabourn Quest

Seabourn Quest is the third iteration of the vessel design that has been called “a game-changer for the luxury segment.” True to her Seabourn bloodlines, wherever she sails around the world, Seabourn Quest carries with her a bevy of award-winning dining venues that are comparable to the finest restaurants to be found anywhere. Seabourn Quest offers a variety of dining options to suit every taste and every mood, with never an extra charge.
  • Travel to historic Godafoss - Waterfall of the heathen gods
  • Go horseback riding in the Tröllaskagi Mountains
  • Visit Tromsø, the starting point for many Arctic Expeditions
  • Look in awe upon the perpendicular cliffs of Nordkapp, the very top of the European continent
For more information on this Seabourn Alaska sailing, or help with booking, please contact your favourite Lloyds Travel Agent!
Itinerary

Day 1Reykjavik, Iceland

Reykjavík, established by Viking settler Ingólfur Arnarson around 870 C.E, is the location of the first permanent settlement in Iceland. The census of 1703 recorded that Reykjavík had 69 residents and consisted of a farm and a church. The impressive statue of Leif Erikson, in the center of town, reminds all of Iceland’s Viking heritage. Its name translates to ‘smoky bay’, due to the geothermal nature of the surrounding area.

Today about 200.000 people live in the Icelandic capital, roughly 60 % of the country’s population. It has evolved into a sophisticated city. The northernmost national capital in the world is also one of the cleanest, greenest, and safest on Earth. Walking Reykjavik streets one will find rich culture, history, music, shopping and in the late hours vibrant night-life. Colorful rooftops and the elegant spire of Hallgrímskirkja Church dominate Reykjaviks’s skyline. Known for its arts, Reykjavik hosts a number of internationally recognized festivals, notably the Iceland Air music festival, Reykjavik Arts Festival and the Reykjavik International Film Festival.

Day 2Patreksfjordur, Iceland

Day 3Akureyri, Iceland

Akureyri is the second largest urban area in Iceland with a population of around 18,000. Nicknamed ‘The Capital of the North,’ it is situated at the head of Eyjafjörður, the longest fjord in Iceland, only 62 miles (100 km) from the Arctic Circle. Surrounded by snow-streaked mountains, the Akureyri hills flourish in summer with a profusion of arctic wildflowers. Mt. Kerling is the highest peak visible from town, at 5,064’ (1,538 m). Often cloudy, with a mild climate, Akureyri has much less precipitation than its southern counterpart Reykjavik. It is a cultured city, with a university, numerous galleries, museums, art exhibitions, and live theater performances.

Nearby Hrísey Island is a spectacularly beautiful and peaceful island often called ‘The Pearl of Eyjafjörður,’ with an atmosphere of calm and settled tranquility. Numerous Atlantic puffins fly overhead, and the occasional whale is seen traversing the fjord.

Day 4Siglufjorour, Iceland

Siglufjörður is the northernmost town on the Icelandic mainland, a small fishing village of some 1,200 people. Founded in 1918, it was in the past the capital of the North Atlantic herring fishing industry. The Síldarminjasafnið Herring Era Museum, one of Iceland’s largest seafaring and industrial museums, houses three different areas where one can learn about both the traditional and the modern herring industry. A collection of many historic fishing vessels and artifacts is proudly displayed by the people of Siglufjörður, detailing how herring was salted, processed and collected. The small harbor with its colorful fishing boats and the red-roofed steeple of the Lutheran church dominate the village-scape.

The natural beauty of the area includes high mountains that rim the fjord, freshwater lakes, the Hólsá river, black sand beaches, and a wealth of birdlife all around. This northernmost region of Iceland is renowned for some of the largest and most dramatic waterfalls in the country.

Day 5 - 6At Sea

Day 7Tromso, Norway

Tromsø is the largest city in northern Norway and the ninth most populous municipality in the country. It surprises visitors with its sophisticated art scene, its contrasting modern and historical architecture, international cuisine, multicultural events, and festivals throughout the year.

Situated 200 miles north of the Arctic Circle, Tromsø is within the land of the midnight sun during summer months and the elusive northern lights in winter. However, thanks to the warming effect of the Gulf Stream, the sea doesn’t freeze here in winter, and there is no permafrost in the vicinity. Tromsø is noticeably milder than other towns at the same latitudes in other parts of the world.

Tromsø is also ‘The City of Explorers’ and has seen a number of expeditions set off from its shores to the probe the polar realm. Both Roald Amundsen and Fridtjof Nansen frequently recruited men in the city. Nowadays home to the Norwegian Polar Institute, Tromsø continues a tradition of being one of the key centers in explorations of the Arctic.

Day 8Storstappen Island, Norway

Honningsvåg is Norway’s northernmost town, and one of the smallest, with its population of 2,000 jammed into a mere one square kilometer. Devoid of permafrost, this subarctic region displays scores of colorful mountain landscapes carpeted during the summer in a lush tapestry of grasses and mountain wildflowers. In this truly unique environment, many private village gardens grow trees, despite the shortness of the Arctic summer. Honningsvåg is also the gateway to the northernmost point of continental Europe, the North Cape, or Nordkapp, often referred to as the ‘end of the world.’

Storstappen Island, rising from the sea to a height of 928’ (283 m), is a valuable nature reserve supporting colonies of some 140 great cormorants, 100 European shags, 20,000 black-legged kittiwakes, 5,000 razorbills and an impressive 100,000 puffins. To be here is a truly awe-inspiring sensory experience, viewing thousands of birds flying to and fro overhead at the same time, creating an almost deafening cacophony of sound with their cries and wingbeats.

Day 8Honningsvag, Norway

The perpendicular cliffs of Nordkapp, or the North Cape, mark the very top of the European continent. This ultimate destination has long drawn adventurous royalty including Oscar II, King of Norway and Sweden, who visited in 1873, and followed by the King of Siam in 1907. The North Cape is located on the island of Mageroey, a name derived from a word that means “meager.” While the landscape may have a lunar appearance, it is not really so isolated. Just 21 miles away, the main town, Honningsvåg, has some 4,000 inhabitants. In summer that number swells when the Sami people and their reindeer settle on the outskirts of town.

Day 8Scenic Cruising North Cape

The looming cliffs of Norway’s North Cape rise directly from the sea 1007 ft/307m to a plateau as flat as a table. This impressive headland has been selected to represent the northernmost point of Europe, even though it is technically located on an island, Magerøya, connected to the mainland by a bridge. At 71° 10’ 20” N latitude, it is just 1,306 mi/2012 km from the North Pole. At this point, the Norwegian Sea, which is part of the Atlantic Ocean, meets the Barents Sea, part of the Arctic Ocean. Further north, the mountainous archipelagoes of Franz Josef Land and Svalbard are the last lands before the Polar Ice Pack. The Midnight Sun does not dip below the horizon here at any time between May 14 and July 31 each year. Sheer and formidable, the North Cape pays its role to the hilt, emphatically declaring itself the end of Europe’s landmass.

Day 9Alta, Norway

Day 10Sortland (Vesteralen), Norway

Sortland is a town standing beside a narrow sound between two large islands in the Vesterålen archipelago in Northern Norway. The name Sortland has come down from archaic Norse referring to a ‘dark river farm.’ The 3,110-foot (948m), cantilever Sortland Bridge arcs above the sound, connecting the islands of Hinnøya and Langøya. The landscape of Vesterålen continues the chain of rugged, steep mountains that rises from the sea in the Lofoten Islands to the south. From Sortland it is easy to find breathtaking scenery in virtually every direction. The Møysalen National Park on Hinnøya surrounds the 4,140-foot Møysalen peak, the second-tallest mountain on any Norwegian island. Picturesque fjords such as the Sigerfjord invite exploration along the island coastline. This far north, the Midnight Sun endures between May 23 and July 23 each year, and it never really gets dark between late April and August.

Day 11Bodo, Norway

Bodø is the administrative center of the region of the same name in Northern Norway, just above the Arctic Circle. There are a number of points of interest in the town itself. The Norwegian National Aviation Museum is the largest in any Nordic nation. The smaller Salten Museum has exhibits of Viking treasure, Sami life, the Lofoten fishery and local history. The village of Kjerringøy nearby is scenically set under alpine peaks, boasting an authentic 19th century trading post and enough character to be used as a location for filming the novels of Knut Hamsen. The village of Saltstraumen is set beside the world’s strongest tidal maelstrom, which runs at 22 knots during peak tides. Just outside Bodø is the picturesque Bodin Church, originally founded in 1240, with a distinctive, teardrop-shaped copper steeple and colorful 17th and 18th century interiors. The Bodø Salmon Center reveals an inside look at the sustainable Norwegian method of salmon farming. Further afield is Svartisen (Black Ice) glacier, Norway’s second largest, which also supports a large population of white-tailed sea eagles.

Day 12 - 13At Sea

Day 14Skagafjordur, Iceland

The deep bay of Skagafjördur cuts into Iceland’s northern coast west of Akureyri. Surrounded by mesa peaks and rolling slopes, this is rich agricultural country renowned for sheep ranching, horse breeding and resounding choral singing. Prosperous Saudárkrókur is the main town. Three islands in the bay, Malmey, Drangey and Lundey are all packed with breeding birds in the summer, including razorbills, guillemots and puffins, for which Lundey is named. Drangey is the most picturesque, a fortress-like block of volcanic tuff rising sheer from the sea. The promontory of Bórdarhöfdi presents a palisade of columnar basalt when seen from the water. The nearby Glaumbaer Museum centers on an authentic turf farmhouse and outbuildings stocked with tools and artifacts breathing life into the past. This might be an opportunity to try a horseback ride on one of the distinctive, small Icelandic horses with their unusual gait. Or pick up a sweater or other item woven from the unique Icelandic wool.

Day 15Stykkisholmur, Iceland

The people of Stykkishólmur on the Snaefellsnes Peninsula in western Iceland have renovated some of the oldest buildings in the town center for new uses aimed at visitors. The old library is now the Library of Water, and innovative art installation using glass columns filled with glacier water, natural light and words to inspire thoughts about weather and more. The fish-packing plant is a restaurant, and Norwegian House, the first two-storey house in Iceland, is a museum of local history. Another favorite is the Volcano Museum, featuring the collections of a native son who became one of the world’s most respected vulcanologists. The town is scenically set on the broad Breidarfjördur Bay. A modern church with swooping architecture crowns the town and its hilltop setting provides panoramic views of the town and bay. The bay is a favorite breeding area for eider ducks, and the town has an Aedarsetur Islands Eider Center offering information about eiders, traditional and modern methods of eider farming and examples of fine eider-down products.

Day 16Reykjavik, Iceland

Reykjavík, established by Viking settler Ingólfur Arnarson around 870 C.E, is the location of the first permanent settlement in Iceland. The census of 1703 recorded that Reykjavík had 69 residents and consisted of a farm and a church. The impressive statue of Leif Erikson, in the center of town, reminds all of Iceland’s Viking heritage. Its name translates to ‘smoky bay’, due to the geothermal nature of the surrounding area.

Today about 200.000 people live in the Icelandic capital, roughly 60 % of the country’s population. It has evolved into a sophisticated city. The northernmost national capital in the world is also one of the cleanest, greenest, and safest on Earth. Walking Reykjavik streets one will find rich culture, history, music, shopping and in the late hours vibrant night-life. Colorful rooftops and the elegant spire of Hallgrímskirkja Church dominate Reykjaviks’s skyline. Known for its arts, Reykjavik hosts a number of internationally recognized festivals, notably the Iceland Air music festival, Reykjavik Arts Festival and the Reykjavik International Film Festival.

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